Becoming a Wisher

The question then becomes: do you want to be a worker or a wisher? Again, I’m not saying the worker perspective is a bad one. If you can set goals and not worry about the details too much, then exertion along a progressive path can be a fun way to spend your time. But if you suck at devising goals for yourself and constantly harp on all the negative stuff that can impede your progress, then perhaps wishing is more your style.

First, to be an effective wisher, you have to stop intermingling worker and wisher perspectives. It’s like the salvation debate, either you receive your salvation through faith or works — but not both. Second, you must accept that specifics don’t matter. For example, if you want an awesome house, who cares about the specific house — awesome is awesome. In short, what you want from life is a delightful time — who cares what form the fun takes.

As a wisher, you’re trying to create a mindset that’s ready to receive and appreciate the things in life that incite delight. The obvious question becomes: if I’m just trying increase my ability to appreciate life, then why wish at all? The answer is: anticipation is a very delightful feeling. For example, I had wished to live in a specific house, and for a few months I dreamt of living there and I even visited the place during an open-house. I had fun imagining myself living there, I studied the details and thought about all the good times I’d have. Ultimately I didn’t get that house — instead, I’m living in an even awesomer abode.

And so what? Awesome is Awesome. When it comes down to it, my true wish is this: I wish for my life to be full of delightful surprises. And I sure was delightfully surprised when I moved into where I’m living now — I love it. I love my best friend and wife, I love my other best bud and son, and now I love where I’m living. For instance, last night I was watching the Epcot, Hollywood Studios, and Magic Kingdom fireworks from my balcony — how neat is that? Sure they were tiny, but still neat.

Listen, it takes just as much blind-faith to be a worker as it does to be a wisher. A worker has to exert all that effort and simply hope it pays off in the end. A worker has no guarantee that he’ll reap a successful harvest — he could put all that work in and pests or blight could wipe it all away. Likewise, a wisher has to maintain a faith that he’ll receive what he requires. For any of this stuff to work, we have to maintain a belief in the benevolence of life. Either life is good or we’ve already lost.

If it was truly us versus life, we’d lose every time. How could we compete against the very power that created us? Duh, we can’t. So either life specifically wants us here, or we simply wouldn’t be here. And if life wants us to exist, then it’s obviously maintaining our existence. We’re just noobs at this game, we have no feasible survival skills to speak of — by some mechanism the food appears and we eat it — and by some mechanism the shelter appears and we live in it. Our only job, and the only job we’re truly capable of performing, is to appreciate this process — to love life and enjoy this gift we’ve been given.

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Fitbit versus Wishbit

Under the worker perspective, you have to earn health, you literally have to buy it with the currency of fitness and nutrition. Sickness is simply waiting around the corner to take advantage of your laziness and lack of diligence. Whereas under the wisher perspective, you’re healthy by default, you simply assume you’re well and you are. Sickness is something you can wish for though — feel bad enough about your circumstances and you basically wish yourself ill.

Under the worker perspective, an abundant life must be earned through hard work — anything less than that is cheating. The harder you work, the more you gain. Whereas under the wisher perspective, abundance is the natural state of existence. Working hard is actually a lack of faith — you can’t force things, you just ask. And the more you ask, the more you receive.

It’s quite obvious that these two perspectives are at odds, at least on the surface. But if you look a little deeper, you’ll see that workers are actually wishers too — they just like to pretend they’re not. For example, imagine a worker sets a goal to open an ice-cream parlor — then think about all the external aspects that have to align for it to happen. He’ll need to find an appropriate space for sale/rent, he’ll need enough money, he’ll have to figure out the marketing aspects, hope the local foot-traffic remains constant, hire the right people, hope the weather works out in his favor, hope ingredient prices remain steady — and I could go on and on. But in short, he’s a wisher that enjoys a granular level of engagement.

As for me, I used to have the worker perspective but sucked at it. I don’t think it’s a bad perspective to have as it certainly fills one’s day with things to do and fuss over. However, I was too easily overwhelmed by the daunting tasks ahead of me, I was frozen by the inertia of it all. As my list about the ice-cream parlor shows, I could imagine a hundred things that I’d need to worry about in order to achieve my goal — so goals seemed impossible.

Now I’m a wisher. The only thing between me and my goals are the hurdles I imagine. So as a wisher, my job is to suppress that aspect of my imagination. In that sense, a wisher is also a worker — but instead of focusing his efforts on the physical world, the wisher focuses on his inner world, crafting a receptive perspective, one that’s ready to receive and appreciate the things that truly delight.

Wishers vs Workers

There are two types of people in this world, wishers and workers.

Workers believe that the things they attain must be earned through effort. For example, many of these folks are working-out, sweating, and denying themselves sweet-treats for the sake of health. All the possessions they have are things they diligently worked-for. Things received or attained without effort are pretty-much worthless.

Wishers on the other hand, believe that things are simply given to them. They desire something, and poof, there it is. Work plus sweat does not add up to them. They gain possessions through wishes and expect life and the many circumstances they encounter to just work-out in their favor.

Growing up, my mentality was such that I put myself in the worker camp. I didn’t believe in wishing and thought wishers were dummys that happened to be lucky once in awhile. I believed that effort on a particular path was the only way to attain something. Unfortunately, I believed most paths to be too strenuous to follow, so I didn’t bother following any path at all.

In other words, I believed that goals required great amounts of effort, too much effort to be worthwhile — so in my mind it seemed logical to do nothing at all. It’s not until relatively recently that I finally kinda understand the wisher’s perspective. It makes sense now and aligns with my preferences a lot better than the worker’s perspective.

I’ve already jumped ship and consider myself a wisher. For example, when I was in the worker camp, I lived in a trailer-park and didn’t enjoy my surroundings. The obvious solution for a worker-type is to simply work harder to change your situation, but unfortunately I believed I couldn’t work that hard, my situation was too extreme, so I just stayed static, a prisoner to my situation.

When I became a wisher, I simply wished for an extreme change. And here I am, months later, and I’m living the dream. Poof. I’m not saying the worker perspective is a bad one, it’s just not for me. I’ve seen plenty of people “work their way up” and all that, and that’s fine. But really, wishes are truly the underlying principle of life. Even a worker wishes — whether he calls it that or not.

Workers set goals and goals are just wishes. They simply wish to be part of a step-by-step process of wish attainment. I thought I wanted that level of granular engagement too, but it turns out I don’t. I am ready to receive! Just gimme the good stuff and leave out the details! Honestly, the details are just busy-work anyway.

If I would have said all this to myself a few years ago, I’d’ve thought myself nuts. I believed Earth to be a harsh landscape in which humans are forced to struggle for survival. Oops, nope. It’s really a magical funhouse in which our wildest dreams come true. How can it not be? I’m literally living twenty minutes from the Magic Kingdom — and I’ve done nothing to get here except wish.

Nicely Manifested

Dear Rich, did the Law of Attraction / The Secret / Alignment with God type stuff just work for you?

Good question dear reader. Let’s examine the facts.

First, for the past seven years I was living in a single-wide mobile-home in a trailer park. I didn’t really enjoy living there and wanted to move to someplace better. I admit that the stigma of living in a mobile-home kinda got to me. But to be fair, I lived in a nice place only a mile and a half from the beach. My old house is currently someone else’s vacation-home — so to say I was in a lamentable spot is nowhere near the truth. Frankly, I didn’t appreciate the good things I had — which is my typical pattern of behavior.

Second, I’m now living in a top-floor two-story condo in the heart of a very nice little town located down the street from Disney World. And that’s significant to me because my family would visit Disney every year when I was a kid and I loved it — it always felt like home to me, it’s comfortable and I know my way around. It’s also significant because I lived in this town ten years ago but left abruptly because my career fizzled out — and because I was working all the time, I never got a chance to really enjoy myself here.

Third, this change happened all without much effort on my part. In fact, when I try to manipulate my circumstances, it typically makes things worse. Also, earlier this year I experimented with the typical “wishing” type stuff associated with manifesting and attainment — yet none of the details came true. But generally, my wish to move to a place I could more easily appreciate, did come true. I like this place, I especially like being able to go for a walk or run from my front-door, traveling through the quaint little streets.

In new-age terminology, you could say I raised my vibration and started manifesting positive things into my life. I stopped dwelling in negativity and lack and started focusing on the good things life has to offer. I stopped saying no to everything and started saying yes. And so one day not long ago, my friend said, “hey let’s move” — and instead of resisting like I normally would, I simply said “okay”. Now here we are, over a thousand miles away, in a nice town in a nice condo across from a nice school.

A New Dawn

Dear Diary,

As I write this, it is the evening of the day upon which the property-manager approved our application. Tomorrow morning we’ll sign the lease and move-in. I suppose this means I’ve officially jumped time-lines — I’ve altered my frequency to one that aligns with good-fortune. Sweet!

Back on my old frequency, I’d deny every gift given, assuming it was a trap. But today and tomorrow, I’ll embrace this gift as a warm ray of afternoon sunlight following a chilly morn. Though thoughts of cold enter my mind, I reject them in favor of the warmth. I smother suspicion with appreciation.

The next words you hear from me, I’ll be in even deeper….

I’m here. It’s the nighttime and I’m currently on an air mattress because we have no furniture to speak of. I don’t mind. We have electricity, water, and internet… what more could I need?

Just to interject, my friend and I would browse through expensive real-estate listings and joke when we’d see big American flags flying from the houses. I’d say, “man, I’d love America too if I lived in that house!” Now here’s our view from the bedroom balcony:

Balcony View

If you can’t see it, it’s a giant American flag waving in the breeze.

My son and I walked over to it tonight. I also showed him the small park his mom and I used to frequent. We even walked downtown and became part of the nightlife, scoping out restaurants, walking past tourists, I loved it. I barely ever walked out the door in my previous house, but this just feels natural.

I’m back. After a decade gone I’m back and this time I intend to enjoy myself.

Lovingly yours,
Rich

Painting Moods

I think the Law of Attraction is an undeniable concept in the sense that our perspective and attitude affect our perceived reality. If you’re in a bad mood, a friendly “Hello!” could be interpreted as a personal attack. But does the Law of Attraction actually cause the world to align with our way of thinking? Luckily, I believe in Simulation Theory, so from that standpoint it’s certainly plausible that the world becomes whatever we think it is.

I do have a problem with the concept of devising specific wishes though. If I’m not that creative, what am I supposed to wish for? What am I supposed to adorn my vision-board with? I don’t know what’s to come in the future. For example, current YouTubers in their late twenties and thirties never imagined the platform they’re currently succeeding on — and for some, the Internet wasn’t even a thing until much later in life.

Additionally, where does the inspiration to wish even come from? Why did someone suddenly feel like posting videos on the Internet? Why did I develop a desire to learn computer programming in my early twenties? Why is my mind filled with thoughts that I type-up and post on this blog? Who knows — yet these prompts to think, act, and desire come from somewhere.

But what we do know, is that our mood tends to directly affect our thoughts, actions, and desires. If I’m in a great mood, my particular thoughts, actions, and desires reflect that fact — same if I’m in a foul mood. So I think the goal is to cultivate the best mood possible, and then everything falls in line as we then perceive our circumstances in the best possible way.

As far as the Law of Attraction goes, I think specific wishes and daydreams are fine in the sense that they’re painting pictures that elicit positive moods and emotions. If I see myself as a champion archer splitting arrows on the target, I’m filling myself up with triumph — I don’t necessarily want to be Robin Hood though. So in that sense, I don’t think I should be tied to my exact wishes and daydreams — they’re simply throw-aways that assist in cultivating a particular mood. Some visions might manifest as depicted, but so what as long as the good times keep rollin’. Which they will, by definition, if I maintain a positive attitude.

End of Attraction Test

I’m not saying the Law of Attraction stuff is bogus, I’m simply saying the typical way in which I went about it isn’t for me. I engaged in a somewhat rigorous experiment to see if I could manifest something, and it didn’t seem to work. Yes, it does appear to work for some people — I’ve seen my friend’s wishes come true for example, and she delights in it. But for me, it’s just not a process I particularly enjoy. She’s got a great imagination and naturally sees abundance in the world.

I know what I don’t like, I’m ready to complain all the time. But as far as what I like, I think I enjoy it more when things come as a surprise. I don’t like to plan out my fun. My friend would love to plan her own party, but I just want to show up to some awesome event that’s perfectly suited to my tastes. In that regard, I’m not taking any responsibility for my fun. I’m just like: hey life… amuse me…. Although I’m not sure if that’s the right way to go about it.

But I’m also not receptive to the fun. Life might very-well accept my demand, but I’m too busy complaining to notice. At the very least I have to enter the event ready and willing to be entertained. It’s like showing up at a feast already full — none of the food is appetizing, in fact it’s kinda gross to see all the overflowing plates. Instead, I have to show-up ready to chow-down. To be fair, the first things I tried were nasty, but I was wrong to assume the entire buffet was as unappealing.

So for me, I don’t think I need to work on my wishing. Delightful surprise is what I wish for. What I need to work on is my willingness to accept what I’m given. Life is a fun-house tasked with providing endless entertainment. What dazzling spectacle is waiting around the next corner!!?? Who knows!!! I shouldn’t be looking to lock-down life by forcing it to manifest my mundane wishes. I should be open, anticipating wondrous amusements that far exceed anything I could ever imagine.