Cool Tools Ep. 1, Drill-bits

Bosch Quick-Change

Ever since I saw Norm Abram from The New Yankee Workshop using a quick-change drill-bit adapter on his drill many years ago, I knew I needed one. And now, I finally have one — this Bosch is it. I also have a Kobalt Quick-Change set I got at Lowes a couple weeks ago and it sucks in comparison to the Bosch. The bits go right in without any finagling, it’s truly a one-handed operation.

 

Dewalt Countersink Set

To go into the quick-change drill-bit adapter, I needed some drill-bits of course. For woodworking I’m mainly driving #6, #8, #10, (and sometimes #4) wood screws. These screws go in best with countersunk pilot-holes, so the ideal drill-bit performs this operation as a single step.

Previously I was using standard drill-bits that I’d tighten in my chuck, then I’d follow-up with a #2 Phillips-head screwdriver to ream out a countersink-hole for the screw head. Yes that’s right, I was twisting a screwdriver back and forth using it as a crude countersink tool every time I put in a screw. Madness!

And now with my quick-change adapter I can easily swap to a #2 Phillips bit after drilling — I can drill and screw as much as I want very quickly compared to when I had to unscrew the chuck every time to switch bits.

 

Snappy Countersink Set

The Dewalt countersink set is decent and it comes with tapered drill-bits which is a neat adaptation. I also purchased these Snappy ones because they’re not tapered and they come with a #4 wood-screw sized bit. The countersink cutters on the Snappy came dull and I had to sharpen them before they’d work effectively — they’re pretty decent now. I still kinda like the Dewalts a little better, but sometimes the top part of the taper can be a little roomy for the incoming screw.

All-in-all, these particular tools have made woodworking much more pleasurable when compared to tightening and untightening the chuck to insert various round drill bits then swapping in a Phillips bit and using a #2 screwdriver as a countersink tool. It seems I was correct in my analysis from last month: it’s not that woodworking sucked or I sucked at woodworking, I just needed more tools.

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Tool Drool Ep. 1, Drills

2018 is my year of woodworking, and I’ll admit, it’s not so much about the wood, but the tools. I love tools.

Bosch PS32 cordless drill

For no good reason I was browsing drills over at Amazon and found this beauty. It’s a Bosch PS32. What I like about it most, is the small size and light weight. The battery is mostly embedded in the handle, making the drill more compact compared to other cordless drills that typically have large batteries hanging off the end. It also has a charge-indicator as well, which my current drill lacks. Of course, it’s a higher-end drill and has a price tag to match, so I can’t justify a buy at this time, but it’s definitely on my wishlist.

 

Black + Decker cordless drill

This is my current drill, a Black + Decker, purchased because of its price. It’s definitely a capable drill and performs perfectly fine. I don’t even charge it that often. Back in the day cordless drills sucked, the batteries couldn’t retain their charge over long periods of inactivity, took overnight to charge, and were very bulky. This drill is always ready to go and charges quickly. My one complaint is the tiny LED light, it could do better at illuminating the drilling area.

 

Hand Drill

And this is my Stanley hand drill — when I was a kid I found it in my father’s older toolbox, he never used it so one day I moved it into my toolbox. I probably asked him first. I do like using it, it’s very smooth and doesn’t overdo it like the motorized drills can. Besides speed and power, the main drawback is that it requires two hands to operate.

 

Schroeder Hand Drill

This one is a smaller hand drill, and it’s on my wishlist just because I like hand drills and wanted a backup for my old Stanley should the need arise. But for fine, delicate work, this would be a good guy to have.