Confundus Charm

We are purposefully confounded by life. Isn’t that how every new game or story starts? You’re thrust into the middle of the action and have to decode what’s happening and find out who’s who. That’s part of the fun, to get dropped into a maze and figure your way out. The trick though, is not to panic. Yes you’re lost, but so what?

You panic when you believe yourself to be a fragile little creature fighting for survival within a big harsh world that doesn’t care about your existence. Step one is to appreciate all the things you haven’t done to ensure your own survival — in other words, your cunning hasn’t been what’s keeping you alive. The game itself maintains your existence.

Number two, is to realize it’s actually not that big. If you pay attention, you keep seeing the same people over and over. Oftentimes it’s the same actual people, other times it’s the same faces, expressions, and mannerisms — personality types tend to repeat pretty regularly. People behave similarly no matter where you go.

Number three: don’t stress about it. If life placed you in a quandary, it will also help you through it. It’s more of a guided game. You couldn’t really figure it out on your own — you have to let life happen. The feeling of free-will and control allows for the most immersive experience — but life will keep you on the correct path if you allow it to — just don’t fight it.

And like every game or story, you not only have to figure out the plot, but the main character’s role within it takes some digging and mystery solving. Who are you? What can you do here? Explore, try things out, it will be revealed as you go. Be true to your character by allowing him to act in accordance with his nature.

You have the ability to apply the brakes, but why would you? It stalls your journey and you get all angsty. When the fear comes, ignore it, it’s not there to protect you, it’s simply the thrill of total-immersion coming through. This is an exciting game with hyper-realistic graphics and unpredictable storylines — ya you’re gonna feel it. But don’t be scared, ride the ride and appreciate the fun.

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Implanted Dreams

What about wishing, manifesting, asking-prayer, goal-setting, etc? Isn’t that free-will?

Where does the inspiration to want come from? Why do you want that particular thing in the first place? The desire is implanted as a prelude for what’s to come. Life is leading you down a specific path by implanting these attractions.

Some dreams are so grand and change-inducing that they can overwhelm the dreamer, causing him to retract and disbelieve the dream. Without trust in life and faith in a grand narrative, he’ll sit stalled and unfulfilled.

The free-will we have is our consent to follow-through with each step along the path. We have no skill but that which is provided for our character-type, our vehicle does all the work, the consciousness mostly watches.

But at critical junctures, the consciousness must choose to move on, accepting each goal. Fear must be rejected and replaced with faith. Immature adherence to any ideals must also be rejected, as life moves on and circumstances broaden.

Your job in life (you the consciousness, the ever-present observer) is as an accepting audience member allowing the scenes to flow uninterrupted from one to the next. Yes, you can invoke manual-control, but try to leave the autopilot on, it makes things much smoother.

Virtual Free Will

If life is an RPG (role-playing game), what about free-will? Because it’s a game, there’s a bunch of preset missions customized for each character. And like a game, characters are of a particular type traveling an appropriate path. RPGs tend to lead characters to the correct checkpoints at the right times. Once at the checkpoint, the player can decide whether to cross or not — but if he doesn’t cross, he’s not allowed to do anything significant, he stalls and becomes depressed.

So as to maintain the illusion of control, life does allow mistakes to be made. In other words, if you try to break something, it’ll break. So yes, recklessness is possible and will likely cause your character to experience some unpleasantness. Manual-control provides the most immersive sensation possible and greatly amplifies the gaming experience — but the drawback is, you can derail your narrative.

But to remain on the rails, it’s not skill that’s necessary, it’s trust in your story — faith. Our character knows what he’s doing, it’s our consciousness that’s completely clueless. Characters are best on autopilot, it’s manual-control and mental-intervention that gets in the way, causing our character to trip over himself. It’s impossible to mentally control the complex process of existence.

Then were does free-will fit in? We enter with a preset personality and an appropriate set of goals that must be accomplished. But we do have consent in the sense that we can refuse to cross each finish-line. Our refusals come from fear or an immature devotion to an ideal. The game doesn’t force us into the next step if we’re not ready to handle it. But again, it’s not a skillset issue, it’s a trust issue — our character can handle it, it’s our consciousness that hinders.

Ultimately the game wants us to win — win in the sense that we engage enjoyably with the world we’re in. If at anytime we derail our narrative, the game is always patient and graciously waits to welcome us back. Our acceptance comes in the form of active-pursuit of the goal. We must head in its direction, doing whatever we’re inspired to do, not filled with doubt and trepidation.

Checkmate Atheists

Ever-advancing technology suggests that humanity will eventually create indistinguishable simulations, in other words, games will become more realistic over time until they’re so immersive that we’re fooled into believing our gaming experiences are real. And if this is ever going to happen, then it most likely happened already. Earth was depleted long ago and humanity lives within a suspended state as minds reside within a simulation. Either the bodies are still on Earth or they’re possibly traveling within a ship in search of another habitable planet. Almost under no circumstance is what we’re seeing real.

How do we know we’re not the first generation of humanity? Here is an earlier post entitled Dreamy Details that provides some common circumstances suggesting that what we’re experiencing isn’t physically real. But the question becomes, was there even a first generation of actual human beings? In a video-game for instance, the characters we control aren’t perfect representations of ourselves, they’re often stripped-down versions of human-like creatures with either limited or exaggerated abilities. Thus, our current human character might be an avatar for a being far different than a human — perhaps even a formless conciousness wishing to experiment with embodied existence.

But if all this is plausible, it means that spirituality is likely an actual phenomenon. And what that means, is that the fundamental nature of existence isn’t up for debate: this is a contrived experience. In other words, life on Earth is not an accident, it was created by something greater than the feeble little characters within it. Therefore, if you truly believe in a physical world, you believe in a powerful creator just as every God-lovin’ religioso does. Cold hard logic suggests that all this is fabricated, whereas it takes a leap of faith to believe humans are fragile creatures struggling for survival within a chance-based physical reality.

Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, I’ll simply ask you this: at the fundamental level, what have you done in your own life to truly provide for yourself? The food is there, the shelter is there, the companionship is there, the activities are there — you need simply reach out and engage with the world so provided for you. You are simply not capable of taking care of yourself — and it is not the collective power of a billion equally clueless hairless apes carrying you through either. No, there is a clear and present power underlying this world ensuring your well-being, ensuring you experience an immersive all-encompassing extravaganza of light and sound, this fun-house known as Earth. In other words: Checkmate, atheists.

Without Form

Misty Marsh

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form and void…

Yesterday I went walking at the marsh. Apparently it hadn’t rendered yet — I was surrounded by pure potential. I’m beginning to intuit that what’s out there really isn’t there — I’m the projector and I’m simply perceiving the screen. There are no landmarks existing independent of my projections.

I should note that I rarely, if ever, go out on little solo excursions such as I did. But for some odd reason, I got into the car and drove to the misty marsh. It was a surreal experience driving through the fog alone on the rendering road in the early morning. After arriving, I walked until I got to the bridge, where I made a wish. Then I continued walking until the first bench — I sat and stared out at the void.

Eventually the spell wore off and I remembered who I had been the day before. Walking back was less mystical — the world was forming. But does it have to be the same world I remember? Or could it have been made anew, into a place more pleasant than I recall?

According to my theory, I must not calculate my route based on input from the senses. Those things out there are only the result, not the source — I am the source. Limitations are the obstacles I define and make manifest. I dangle tantalizing items just out of reach, causing my own frustration. I decorate my surroundings with ghouls and ghosts that frighten. All is illusion colored by my imagination.

P.S. Is it Saturday again?… Oh, yep, check.

New Lands

When things get cramped, humanity goes exploring, discovering new lands to disperse into. Yet what happens when there’s no place left to go? Well amazingly, new territories appear on the map. Columbus thought he’d find India traveling across the ocean, but oops, something just happened to be in the way, a giant continent. And so a swarm of people left the density of Europe for the relative openness of the Americas. Coincidence?

Well what’s left today? The forests? Oceans? Mars? Cyberspace? All of the above? Solar and battery technology along with satellite and radio communications will make moving away from population centers more doable. And with advancing rocket technology, colonies on Mars are becoming more feasible. As for cyberspace, much of my life already takes place online, a virtual existence — why bother to leave the house at all?

In cyberspace, I can browse the endless aisles of Amazon. I can watch shows catering to my particular personality. I can read the compiled works of human literature. I can video-chat with my mom who’s hundreds of miles away. I can control giant battling robots. And these worlds intersect when people you meet online manifest in-person or when packages arrive or when your heart races from a rather intense online-battle.

But new land doesn’t come cheap does it? There’s always a bit of struggle, no? Whether it’s legislative control, corporate hegemony, restricted bandwidth, technological limitations, griefers, hackers — whatever form it may be. But what game comes without challenge — overcoming obstacles is the entire point of many games. So, the things that get in our way are just part of the fun.

We must consider that not everyone left the Old World for the New, so we shouldn’t expect old ways to be overwritten by the new. Ideally, we should all support each other’s right to go in the direction we choose. Just because we don’t like a certain path, we shouldn’t attempt to shut it down. If people want to live in the forests, in the ocean, on Mars, in cyberspace, or wherever and however they want — then good for them.

By the way, such an obvious pattern of constant realm-expansion should serve as evidence of life’s artificiality. For those of us too tightly wound, we should use these little reminders as reason not to take life too seriously — it’s for entertainment purposes only. There’s always something newer and bigger around the corner. Lack isn’t real, there’s nothing physical confining us. Relax and enjoy the show.

Magical Mystery

I don’t think there’s any question as to whether magic is real. Magic is the manifestation of intent. From childhood dreams, to success stories, to wishes, to just plain goal-setting, there’s determination underlying whatever comes next. How the particulars happen, we don’t really know or care — external events align and the things we had imagined appear before us.

If the world was purely physical, then things wouldn’t miraculously align like that. The circumstances and people we require wouldn’t waltz into our path like they do. Yet as if by magic, things do synchronize. People do end up fulfilling childhood fantasies, people do meet the spouse of their dreams, people do overcome extraordinary odds, people do obtain success.

So there’s no debate over whether magic exists, the question is, how can we manipulate these forces to satisfy our desires. But a deeper question becomes: can we actually control this magic and do we even want to? Consider this: where do these inspiring daydreams come from? An idea simply pops into our thought-stream and suddenly we want it to come true — but why?

Is there an external narrative going on in which we simply play our part? Perhaps life is purposefully providing the false impression that we have influence over it. In other words, life does all the heavy-lifting but wants us to think we’re doing it ourself. But how could we — we barely know anything. We’re on autopilot — situations present themselves and we simply go along for the ride.

For another perspective, imagine watching a play on a stage. We the audience can’t help the production along — but we can certainly screw it up. We can become overly involved in the plot and shout about what’s going on. We can allow ourself to become outraged over little things or get distracted by a particular scene, focusing on the details we don’t like, no longer paying attention to the action currently happening. We can fail to give the playwright the benefit-of-the-doubt, criticizing the entire time, booing whenever the mood strikes. We can fail to appreciate all the effort that went into the production, yelling about what a waste of time it is.

So which is it? Are we creating the world as we live it — perhaps in a dream-like manner? Is there a pre-written narrative in which we watch as if on an amusement-park ride? Are we capable of changing any or all of it? Do we even want to? Are we the author, actor, or audience? Are the answers to these questions purposefully obfuscated in order to maintain the mirage, adding an element of mystery? Is the world all things to all people, allowing every question’s answer to depend on the perspective?