Simulated Success

Take my experience in Stardew Valley for example, where I lived an entire life over the course of a few weeks. As a single-fella that showed up in town, I created a rather successful farm, went on several adventures, and courted my wife Emily (with whom I had a couple kids). Of course I can’t forget about my faithful companion Brownie, my horse that carried me wherever I wanted to go.

My point is: I’m not incompetent when it comes to making a successful life for myself. I pursued and achieved my goals. The only reason I stopped playing, was because there was no growth potential left — my farm produced tons of income and I had lots of savings, but the farm-work was getting tedious, and I couldn’t simply hire farm-hands to take over. Essentially there were no upgrades left, nothing else to buy.

Stardew Valley is somewhat open-ended too. I specifically chose to build up a very profitable farm and start a family. Yet it vexes me in this life that such financial success eludes me. To be fair, my in-game character inherited his farm — which provided a starting point. But in this life, I’ve been more of a rudderless boat, adrift and anxious over my lack of resources and direction.

And Stardew Valley is no isolated incident by the way, there are plenty of games in which I’ve built up slowly yet purposefully, becoming a dominant figure over time. It’s not that I spend a lot of time playing games either, these are just occasional tangents. Am I incredibly bad at THIS game? Is the difficulty setting simply TOO high? I don’t know but I don’t like it. Therefore, although I am loath to do so, I give this game ONE star. Enough of this lobby-level B.S.