Illogical Outcomes

I’ve noticed that sometimes I persistent in an endeavor despite any perceptible improvement. In other words, I know what I want to accomplish and I keep working at it, yet I have zero progress to prove I’m headed in the right direction. Then finally, after a long bout of activity fueled by determination, the goal is achieved. That’s strange. It’s not logical.

Imagine it like this: I want some food from the supermarket, so I get in the car. I drive around and around for awhile and finally find myself in the parking lot. I didn’t follow a particular route, I just drove and made turns whenever I felt like it. Yet for some reason, I successfully arrived at my destination. That’s a silly premise.

It seems as though life is rewarding my blind effort, or simply fulfilling my expectation — I’m not sure which. I’ve noticed this many times: that a particular input doesn’t necessarily lead to a logical result. Logically and statistically, arbitrary activity should result in an unusable mess, not a functional product — yet oftentimes it works out in the end.

As a general recipe, persistence shouldn’t work as well as it does. It’s even offered as a common piece of advice: “Keep it up!” Logically, it makes sense to follow a systematic course of action, not simply trying the same thing over and over. This points to a non-physical foundation of reality. In the mind for example, when we’re trying to remember something, repetition makes sense.

It seems like the pathways we’re trying to carve are wrought with repetition. And if that’s the way we remember it, then that’s the way it is. “Affirmations” for instance, is the practice of repetitiously writing a desired outcome over and over again. In a non-physical world, there aren’t systematic paths to goals, there’s only a wish and an expectation of outcome.

But just because we want something, doesn’t mean we expect to receive it. Oftentimes we don’t feel we deserve it or we think it’s impossible from a logical standpoint. So in order to align our expectations with our wish, we must instill in ourself a sense of worthiness AND forget about logic. The way to accomplish this is through repetition.

That’s not so easy by the way, persistence requires patience. First you must define what it is you actually want. Then you have to believe yourself deserving of it. Then you must have hope, which is hard because you’ll lack physical proof of progression. Logical thinking will constantly get in your way, so it must be dismissed. But if you keep it up, you too will become a master of magic.