Cool Tools Ep. 1, Drill-bits

Bosch Quick-Change

Ever since I saw Norm Abram from The New Yankee Workshop using a quick-change drill-bit adapter on his drill many years ago, I knew I needed one. And now, I finally have one — this Bosch is it. I also have a Kobalt Quick-Change set I got at Lowes a couple weeks ago and it sucks in comparison to the Bosch. The bits go right in without any finagling, it’s truly a one-handed operation.

 

Dewalt Countersink Set

To go into the quick-change drill-bit adapter, I needed some drill-bits of course. For woodworking I’m mainly driving #6, #8, #10, (and sometimes #4) wood screws. These screws go in best with countersunk pilot-holes, so the ideal drill-bit performs this operation as a single step.

Previously I was using standard drill-bits that I’d tighten in my chuck, then I’d follow-up with a #2 Phillips-head screwdriver to ream out a countersink-hole for the screw head. Yes that’s right, I was twisting a screwdriver back and forth using it as a crude countersink tool every time I put in a screw. Madness!

And now with my quick-change adapter I can easily swap to a #2 Phillips bit after drilling — I can drill and screw as much as I want very quickly compared to when I had to unscrew the chuck every time to switch bits.

 

Snappy Countersink Set

The Dewalt countersink set is decent and it comes with tapered drill-bits which is a neat adaptation. I also purchased these Snappy ones because they’re not tapered and they come with a #4 wood-screw sized bit. The countersink cutters on the Snappy came dull and I had to sharpen them before they’d work effectively — they’re pretty decent now. I still kinda like the Dewalts a little better, but sometimes the top part of the taper can be a little roomy for the incoming screw.

All-in-all, these particular tools have made woodworking much more pleasurable when compared to tightening and untightening the chuck to insert various round drill bits then swapping in a Phillips bit and using a #2 screwdriver as a countersink tool. It seems I was correct in my analysis from last month: it’s not that woodworking sucked or I sucked at woodworking, I just needed more tools.

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